The Butterfly Lodge is uniquely created to house about 20 local butterfly species. You can get up-close to them and be awed by the beauty of these flying jewels. Read More...

The Dynamic Root Floating (DRF) Technique is a nutrient circulation hydroponics system used in a tropical climate which Oh' Farms adopts, growing hygienic and high quality leafy vegetables and culinary herbs all year round. Read More...

Designed and made in Japan, the Horizontal Pillow Packing Machine is available in two models to suit all your packing needs. Read More...

With a good understanding of the culinary and medicinal values of Herbs & Spices, not only will it enhance the flavour of food when used in cooking but also a healthier life style as it will cut down the usage of oil, artificial seasonings and condiments. Read More...

Oh' Farms has the knowhow and facilities to process ready-to-cook vegetables. Peel, cut, dice, chop or slice to your requirement, these cut-vegetables are hygienically packed and ready for immediate cooking. Read More...

Basics

History

The word "hydroponics" comes from two Greek words: "hydro" (water) and "ponos" (to work, labor). In the early 1930s, Professor Gericke of U.C.L.A. in the U.S.A. coined the name to describe the growing of plants with their roots suspended in water containing mineral nutrients. His work and research is considered the basis for all forms of hydroponic growing even though it was primarily limited to water culture without the use of a growing medium.

Hydroponics is not a new concept. Many believed that this farming method was practiced during the times of ancient Egypt. Hieroglyphic records dating back to several hundred years B.C. describe the growing of plantations that were nourished only by the silt-laden waters of the Nile.

Archaeological excavations suggest that one of the Seven Wonders of the World, The Hanging Gardens of Babylon, was an ancient plant support system, where fresh water rich in oxygen and nutrients were supplied by a pump. It was probably one of the first successful attempts to grow plants hydroponically.

In the 11th century, the Aztecs of Central America practiced hydroponic growing methods out of necessity. Without land to grow plants, they were forced to learn other ways of producing crops.

Examples of "hydroponic culture" - the floating gardens of the Chinese, were also described by Marco Polo in his famous journal.

During World War II, hydroponic greenhouses turned out vegetables for American troops stationed on Pacific Islands with poor soil.